do not enter

zeiss 15mm f2.8 distagon manual focus lens ze mount for canon

Such an ironic perspective of The Big Apple… “DO NOT ENTER” in front of the Melting Pot of the world. The sharp detail in the foreground contrasts beautifully with the soft slightly out of focus view of the city, and metaphorically supports the irony captured in this image. Taken with a Carl Zeiss ultra wide angle 15mm Distagon lens at f/2.8 to create this shallow depth of field effect.

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surreal

Zeiss 15mm f2.8 wide angle distagon lens

This photo looks like a cross between an actual photograph and a Salvador Dali painting, which is why it’s surreal to me when I look at it. The muted blues and grays in the sky, and the warm oranges and reds in the city and the water give this image a very special feeling that anyone who has ever lived in New York can appreciate within a few seconds of viewing it. This would be stunning as a large floating canvas print in 20×30 or 30×45. Taken with a Carl Zeiss 15mm f2.8 wide angle Distagon lens, 30-second exposure, f/11, tripod, remote release.

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lead the way

zeiss 15mm f2.8 Distagon lens

‘This way to New York’… that’s what this photo says to me. The 59th Street Bridge leads the way to hopes and dreams every single day for millions of us, so this photo has a very special place in my collection

Managing the distortion to make wide angle lenses work for your photo is something that I’m still learning. The majority of the shots I take with ultra wide angles are booooring, but once I remind myself the rule of wide angles… YOU CAN NEVER BE TOO CLOSE, then my shots start getting interesting again. Only THEE most beautiful skylines and landscapes turn out the way you think they will with lenses as wide as this (Zeiss 15mm f2.8 Distagon). “Normal” scenes shot from normal distances get minimized so much with ultra wides that it creates the opposite effect of what you were trying to accomplish… your stunning expansive subject suddenly looks minuscule in the vast space captured around it by the lens. Using wide angles EXTREMELY close is the only technique I’ve found that undoes this effect, and it also creates some interesting perspectives because of the distortion.

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